Collapsing Avgorou roads a result of shoddy sewerage works

Officials visited Avgorou in Famagusta on Monday to inspect serious subsidence caused by shoddy construction of the village’s sewerage system.

Sections of a road collapsed suddenly on Saturday causing thousands of euros of damage to two cars when unsuspecting drivers drove into a hole on the tarmac, community leader Panayiotis Michaelas said on Monday.

He said that the collapse in Ammochostos Street was not the first. Sudden subsidence had also appeared on the Avgorou-Achna road and another one in Ikarion Street.

The latter, Michaelas said, which was six metres deep and 1200 metres wide, is currently being reconstructed at an estimated cost of €4m.

“The car owners have invoices with damage estimates, which will be sent to the water development department for compensation,” he said. No injuries were reported.

Michaelas said that construction on the Avgorou sewerage system began in 2010, and that ever since he took over in 2012, he had been dealing with “the shabby work done on the sewerage system”.

He said that following Saturday’s collapse, he had informed Auditor-general Odysseas Michaelides, who gave instructions for that part of the road to remain closed until experts from his service visit the area.

The problems the community faces due to the bad sewerage construction work have been reported several times, Michaelas said, adding that the community council had been trying since 2010 to bring it to the attention of MPs, ministers and President Nicos Anastasiades himself.

He said that Agriculture Minister Nikos Kouyialis, who visited Avgorou several times, gave instructions to repair the holes, “but they were just patched up”.

He said that last year, following President Anastasiades’ visit to the area, “it was agreed that the public works department would record and assess the damage and the timeframe given to us as regards repairs was about two months. But so far no damage estimation was made.”

“Every time it rains we fear that land slippage will occur, because developers did a bad job,” Michaelas said.

 

Via